Monthly Archives: November 2017

Rebuttal to an Abstinence Only Advocate

One of our group members wrote a rebuttal to a local newspaper column that had espoused an abstinence only view of opiate recovery. Our member wrote "It does no good to judge an addict on their form of treatment. What matters is if the treatment is successful or not." Listen in as the group discusses their views about medication assisted treatment and recovery.

Discussion Guide:

Have you utilized medicated assisted treatment for opiate addiction? If so, in your opinion, how does it compare to opiate abstinence without medication?

Have you been prevented from utilizing MAT (Medication Assisted Treatment) from someone in authority over you?

How do you combat negative and misinformed comments about MAT? What are the dangers of expounding a negative view?

How do you respond to the stigma against substance abusers as if it is a moral issue?

In what way is MAT similar and dissimilar to insulin for diabetes? Do you think it is a good analogy?

Have others implied that you should "man up" and stop using MAT? How has this effected you?

 

 

In the News: Duterte, Baking Soda Bombs, Narcan

Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss the news of the week. Narcan is now available at all Walgreens pharmacies; Duterte reluctantly ends the killing of drug users; and Baking Soda Bombs are the latest way to cheat a drug screen.

Discussion Guide:

Do you have a Narcan kit?

If not, do you know where you can get one?

Do you need a Narcan prescription in your state in order to get Narcan?

What are the pros and cons of drug screens?

Have you attempted to cheat a drug screen?

Have you heard of 'Baking Soda Bombs'? What are they?

Have you heard of the Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte's war on drugs? If not, check out our previous podcast on 2/7/17.

Supplemental Reading:

Bill Chappell, Narcan Opioid Overdose Spray Is Now Stocked By All Walgreens Pharmacies, http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/26/560180901/walgreens-stocks-narcan-opioid-overdose-spray-in-all-pharmacies

Paul Fuhr, Baking Soda Bombs Emerge As Latest Drug Test Trend in South Dakota, http://www.thefix.com/baking-soda-bombs-emerge-latest-drug-test-trend-south-dakota

Bryan Le, Duterte Ends Bloody Philippine Drug War, http://www.thefix.com/duterte-ends-bloody-philippine-drug-war

President Trump Declared Opioid Crisis a Public Health Emergency

President Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency. More than 140 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose. The nation's Public Health Emergency Fund has a current balance of just $57,000. But the opioid crisis is a $14 billion problem, at minimum. Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss how they would approach the crisis, if they had the funds to do so.

Discussion Guide:

Are you familiar with the declaration of the opioid crisis as a public health emergency? How is a public health emergency different from a national emergency?

What are the pros and cons of this declaration?

If you were in a position to change policy and were given funds to address the crisis, what strategies would you recommend?

Supplemental Reading:

Claude Brodesser-Akner, 7 takeways from Trump's opioids public health emergency: What it really means, http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/10/5_takeaways_from_trumps_public_health_emergency_de.html

Should An Opioid Relapse Be a Punishable Crime?

Consider this scenario. You are on probation for a drug related crime, you quickly enter treatment and relapse early in your recovery. Should you immediately be subject to probation violation and sent to prison? Or, is the disease of addiction cause to deter criminal punishment? Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss their opinions on this topic.

Discussion Guide:

Is addiction a choice or a disease? 

Do you believe that opioid addiction causes you to be prone to relapses?

Does the threat of incarceration motivate substance dependent people toward recovery?

If  addiction is a medical condition and relapsing is a part of the disease, is it unconstitutional to punish the addict with incarceration?

Under what circumstances is incarceration a reasonable outcome for opioid addicts?  

What do you recommend as guidelines for the criminal justice system in making these decisions?

Supplemental Reading:

Deborah Becker, Court to Rule on Whether Relapse Be An Addicted Opioid User Should Be a Crime, http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/26/559541332/court-to-rule-on-whether-relapse-by-an-addicted-opioid-user-should-be-a-crime

Attitudes and Stigma Drive Opioid Treatment and Policy, Not Research

Psychiatrist, Sarz Maxwell says that one of the greatest barriers to treatment and effective drug policy are attitudes towards drugs. Addiction is not seen as a disease, but as a moral failing. Methadone and Suboxone are not drugs of choice. They are medicines. Listen in to this opiate support group discuss stigma .

Discussion Guide:

It is said that this opioid epidemic is getting worse and the stigma against opioid abusers is worsening. Why would this be the case?

Dr. Maxwell said "It is not what the person does to the drug, it's what the drug does to the person." What does this mean?

Abstinence is one of the least effective methods of treatment for opioid addiction and has the lowest recovery rate. Have you been successful with long term abstinence without medication such as Methadone and Suboxone?

"Addiction is the only disease where we expect the patient to be immediately symptom and medication free."  Do people have this expectation of you?

In a genetically predisposed addict's brain, there are too many opioid receptors and too few endorphins. This can cause people to use substances in an effort to get normal. Did you feel abnormal without an opioid boost?