Tag Archives: drug addiction

Developing Treatment for Cocaine Addiction: TMS

Opiate addicts are fortunate to have several treatment medications that help decrease cravings, stop withdrawal, and block feelings of eupohoria from opiates. Unfortunately, there is no comparable medication for cocaine addiction. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is now being applied to stimulate areas of the brain that control impulses. This is a foreign and frightening procedure for most people. Would you be willing to zap your brain in order to be free of a cocaine addiction? Listen in to this opiate recovery group as they discuss TMS.

Discussion Guide:

Are you familiar with TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) and ECT (Electro-Convulsive Therapy)?

How do these treatments work?

Would you be willing to be zapped in an attempt to be free of cocaine?

Supplemental Reading:

Meredith Wadman, Brain-altering Magnetic Pulses Could Zap Cocaine Addiction, http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/08/brain-altering-magnetic-pulses-could-zap-cocaine-addiction

When Doctors Become Addicted

Between 8% and 12% of people will develop a substance abuse problem at some point in their lives. Physicians are vulnerable to substance abuse at the same rate as the general population yet they have higher recovery rates. Doctors with the most addiction problems tend to be anesthesiologists, emergency room doctors and psychiatrists. However, they can be more reluctant to enter treatment because of the fear of losing their professional licenses. Many state medical boards run special treatment programs for physicians and others in the health care industry. Should they have specialized treatment? Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss this special population.

Discussion Guide:

Why would a physician be vulnerable to substance abuse?

What makes physicians better able to hide their addiction?

Should they have their own treatment programs?

Why would they have higher recovery rates than the general population?

Supplemental Reading:

Soumya Karlamangla, Doctors and Drug Abuse: Why Addictions Can be So Difficult, http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-doctors-addiction-20170720-story.html

Behavioral Addiction vs. Substance Addiction

When we think of addiction, we immediately think of alcohol, drugs and gambling.  Few of us think of sex, social media or spending as addictions. The DSM 5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) does not recognize behavioral addictions, other than gambling. Behaviors such as sex, social media and spending are not included in the approved list of addictions. But should they be included? Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss the similarities and differences between behavioral addictions and substance addictions.

Discussion Guide:

Are you familiar with the terms behavioral addictions, or process addictions? What are they?

Name examples of behavioral addictions.

How are behavioral addictions different than substance addictions?

How are they similar?

Do these two types of addictions have similar or dissimilar outcomes?

Supplemental Reading:

Robert Weiss, Can You Really be Addicted to a Behavior? http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/can-you-really-be-addicted-to-a-behavior_us_59938c79e4b0a88ac1bc380e

Marc Lewis, Behavioral Addictions vs. Substance Addictions https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/addicted-brains/201306/behavioral-addictions-vs-substance-addictions

What’s Up with Civil Commitments for Substance Abusers?

There are times when we cannot act in our own best interests and others need to intervene. When people are deemed to be a danger to themselves or others a judge can order treatment. Most people are aware of involuntary commitments to psychiatric care especially in the case of suicide or homicide. But civil commitments to substance abuse treatment is less frequently ordered. The opioid crisis has led to a surge in petitions for civil commitments. Too many people have died of opioid overdoses and families are desperate for help to keep their loved one alive. Listen in to this opiate support recovery group discuss their experiences with civil commitments.

Discussion Guide:

Have you ever been involuntarily committed to treatment because you were thought to be a danger to yourself or others? What was the process?

Do you believe that involuntary commitments are helpful? Can it keep people safe?

Are involuntary commitments appropriate for opiate dependent people to ensure they don't die of overdose?

Not all counties offer civil commitments for substance abusers. Does your town have a commitment process for substance abusers?

If you were involuntarily committed to treatment in your town, are there programs in your area that are skilled, accessible and affordable? Do you trust a judge's opinion on where they may send you?

What could go wrong with involuntary commitments?

Supplemental Reading:

Maria Cramer, Worse Than Jail: Addicts Civilly Committed Say DOC Abused Them and Failed to Treat Them, https://www.boston.com/news/local-news/2017/07/14/worse-than-jail-addicts-civilly-committed-say-doc-abused-them-and-failed-to-treat-them

Are Narcan Parties a Thing?

Have you heard the rumor that groups of people are having Narcan parties? It is alleged that thrill seekers want the experience of dying and are using Narcan to pull them back from death. Is it fact or fiction? Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they give their opinions on the subject.

Discussion Guide:

Have you heard of "Narcan parties" also known as "Lazarus parties"?

People who abuse substances are risk takers. They never know if they will die from their next fix. Have you pushed the limits so far that you have depended on someone else to bring you back with Narcan?

Do you think the people who would participate in a Narcan party are suicidal, thrill seekers or both?

Who would be more likely to use Narcan to bring them back from the dead? An opiate dependent person or a non-dependent person?

What does Narcan do to a person who is addicted to opiates upon their regaining consciousness?

Have you ever known a drug dealer to offer Narcan with their heroin or opiates? What would the purpose be?

How will the so called Narcan parties hurt opiate addicts and add to the stigma against them?

Who benefits from the reports of these parties?

Supplemental Reading:

Chris Elkins, Are Narcan Parties Really a Growing Trend? http://www.drugrehab.com/2017/05/12/are-narcan-parties-a-growing-trend/

Is It Hard for You To Ask for Help?

Many people have difficulty asking for help. Especially when it pertains to an embarrassing or shameful situation. People who realize they need help for an addiction can be reluctant to reach out. Listen in to hear our opiate support group talk about their experiences of asking for help.

Discussion Guide:

Is it easy for you to ask for help? If not, which of the following ways would make it easier? What are the pros and cons of each?

1. Write your request in a letter or email

2. Talk to someone you trust

3. Discuss your struggle with a stranger

4. Reach out to a medical professional

5. Search for online resources

6. Seek out someone who has been in your position

7. Call a helpline

Supplemental Reading:

Beth Leipholtz, 7 Ways to Ask for Help When You're Struggling with Addiction, https://www.thefix.com/7-ways-ask-help-when-you-re-struggling-addiction

What’s the Purpose of Support Groups?

Should you talk about your addiction war stories? Some people believe that telling your addiction history is not helpful. They fear that it could cause cravings and relapse to themselves and others. On the other hand, isn't your support group the appropriate place to talk out your trauma? It can be healing. Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss the rationale and goals of support groups.

Discussion Guide:

Have you felt that some of your group members have glorified their drug related behavior in the past?

If so, has that triggered a craving or relapse for you?

What are the pros and cons of telling your story to other group members?

What do you think the rationale and goals of support groups are?

What is the most helpful thing that you have experienced from your support group?

Supplemental Reading:

Group Interventions for Treatment of Psychological Trauma, http://www.agpa.org/docs/default-source/practice-resources/group-interventions-for-treatment-of-trauma-in-adults.pdf?sfvrsn=2, see page 32-33.

Trauma and Addiction are Connected

It is not surprising that people who have been traumatized are more likely to abuse substances. For example, those who have been sexually abused are more likely to use drugs than the general public. It is said that they are 3.4 times more likely to use marijuana, 6 times more likely to use cocaine, 10 times more likely to use other major drugs. This podcast explores the connection between trauma and addiction. Listen in to hear this opiate recovery group discuss their experiences and opinions.

Discussion Guide:

Have you experienced trauma?

Do you believe the trauma predisposed you to an addiction?

What would you say the root cause of your addiction is?

Some say that you are as sick as your secrets. Have you had counseling to address the trauma?

If you went to rehab, were you in a dual diagnosis program? Was it helpful?

What would you look for in a counselor?

Supplemental Reading:

Jennifer Storm, How Trauma, Victimization and Addiction Are All Connected, http://www.thefix.com/how-trauma-victimization-and-addiction-are-all-connected

Kaiser Permanente, Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) Questionnaire http://www.ncjfcj.org/sites/default/files/Finding%20Your%20ACE%20Score.pdf

Opiatesupportgroup.com Podcast, Childhood Trauma Is Found to Underlie Most Addictions, May 21, 2017

Group Member Profiles: What’s Their Story?

Our group received an email this week from Dan. He wrote "I have listened to every one of your podcasts and I really enjoy them. The one thing I have noticed is that we never learn about the stories of how the people in the discussion got addicted in the first place. It would be nice if any of the members would be willing to talk about their histories. Keep up the good work and thank you for what you all do." Dan asked for it, and we delivered. Listen in to hear three group members share their stories.

Discussion Guide:

What is your addiction story?

Describe your life before addiction.

Describe your life during active addiction.

Describe your recovery process.

What is your biggest regret?

What advise would you give others?

What do you hope for in the future?

 

 

It Is Unethical and Inhumane To Withhold Narcan (Naloxone)

A stigma against people who abuse substances exists. Most often it is subtle, but now and then it is loud and ugly. Sheriff Richard Jones in Butler County, Ohio said that he will not equip his deputies with Narcan. "My officers don't carry Narcan, nor will they". He will change his position only if he is court ordered to begin carrying Narcan. Also in Ohio, Dan Picard, Councilman from Middletown, proposed a two strikes and you're out policy. He suggested that the council explore the possibility of denying emergency medical services to people who have sought overdose intervention twice before. Listen in to this group of addicts share their opinions on the matter.

Discussion Guide:

Have you overdosed? If so, were you revived with Narcan? How would you describe the benefits of Narcan to someone who is not familiar with it?

Have you experienced a stigma as a result of having a drug dependency? Please describe it.

If you, a close friend or a family member were denied Narcan and died as a consequence, what steps would you take to seek justice? And what steps would you take to ensure it doesn't happen again?

What are the underlying values of people who would withhold Narcan?

As the costs associated with overdoses increases, how do you think communities or the overdose patients should pay for it?

Some people think that withholding emergency medical response to overdose patients is manslaughter and premeditated murder. Do you agree or disagree?

Supplemental Reading:

Nick Wing, Sheriff In Heart of Ohio's Opioid Epdemic Refuses to Carry Overdose Reversal Drug, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/richard-jones-butler-county_us_595fb129e4b02e9bdb0c3b78

Corky Siemaszko, Ohio Councilman Sparks Fury After Asking If EMS Can Stop Responding to Overdoses, http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/americas-heroin-epidemic/ohio-councilman-sparks-fury-after-asking-if-ems-can-stop-n778711