Tag Archives: Medication Assisted Treatment

What’s the Purpose of Support Groups?

Should you talk about your addiction war stories? Some people believe that telling your addiction history is not helpful. They fear that it could cause cravings and relapse to themselves and others. On the other hand, isn't your support group the appropriate place to talk out your trauma? It can be healing. Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss the rationale and goals of support groups.

Discussion Guide:

Have you felt that some of your group members have glorified their drug related behavior in the past?

If so, has that triggered a craving or relapse for you?

What are the pros and cons of telling your story to other group members?

What do you think the rationale and goals of support groups are?

What is the most helpful thing that you have experienced from your support group?

Supplemental Reading:

Group Interventions for Treatment of Psychological Trauma, http://www.agpa.org/docs/default-source/practice-resources/group-interventions-for-treatment-of-trauma-in-adults.pdf?sfvrsn=2, see page 32-33.

Trauma and Addiction are Connected

It is not surprising that people who have been traumatized are more likely to abuse substances. For example, those who have been sexually abused are more likely to use drugs than the general public. It is said that they are 3.4 times more likely to use marijuana, 6 times more likely to use cocaine, 10 times more likely to use other major drugs. This podcast explores the connection between trauma and addiction. Listen in to hear this opiate recovery group discuss their experiences and opinions.

Discussion Guide:

Have you experienced trauma?

Do you believe the trauma predisposed you to an addiction?

What would you say the root cause of your addiction is?

Some say that you are as sick as your secrets. Have you had counseling to address the trauma?

If you went to rehab, were you in a dual diagnosis program? Was it helpful?

What would you look for in a counselor?

Supplemental Reading:

Jennifer Storm, How Trauma, Victimization and Addiction Are All Connected, http://www.thefix.com/how-trauma-victimization-and-addiction-are-all-connected

Kaiser Permanente, Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) Questionnaire http://www.ncjfcj.org/sites/default/files/Finding%20Your%20ACE%20Score.pdf

Opiatesupportgroup.com Podcast, Childhood Trauma Is Found to Underlie Most Addictions, May 21, 2017

Group Member Profiles: What’s Their Story?

Our group received an email this week from Dan. He wrote "I have listened to every one of your podcasts and I really enjoy them. The one thing I have noticed is that we never learn about the stories of how the people in the discussion got addicted in the first place. It would be nice if any of the members would be willing to talk about their histories. Keep up the good work and thank you for what you all do." Dan asked for it, and we delivered. Listen in to hear three group members share their stories.

Discussion Guide:

What is your addiction story?

Describe your life before addiction.

Describe your life during active addiction.

Describe your recovery process.

What is your biggest regret?

What advise would you give others?

What do you hope for in the future?

 

 

It Is Unethical and Inhumane To Withhold Narcan (Naloxone)

A stigma against people who abuse substances exists. Most often it is subtle, but now and then it is loud and ugly. Sheriff Richard Jones in Butler County, Ohio said that he will not equip his deputies with Narcan. "My officers don't carry Narcan, nor will they". He will change his position only if he is court ordered to begin carrying Narcan. Also in Ohio, Dan Picard, Councilman from Middletown, proposed a two strikes and you're out policy. He suggested that the council explore the possibility of denying emergency medical services to people who have sought overdose intervention twice before. Listen in to this group of addicts share their opinions on the matter.

Discussion Guide:

Have you overdosed? If so, were you revived with Narcan? How would you describe the benefits of Narcan to someone who is not familiar with it?

Have you experienced a stigma as a result of having a drug dependency? Please describe it.

If you, a close friend or a family member were denied Narcan and died as a consequence, what steps would you take to seek justice? And what steps would you take to ensure it doesn't happen again?

What are the underlying values of people who would withhold Narcan?

As the costs associated with overdoses increases, how do you think communities or the overdose patients should pay for it?

Some people think that withholding emergency medical response to overdose patients is manslaughter and premeditated murder. Do you agree or disagree?

Supplemental Reading:

Nick Wing, Sheriff In Heart of Ohio's Opioid Epdemic Refuses to Carry Overdose Reversal Drug, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/richard-jones-butler-county_us_595fb129e4b02e9bdb0c3b78

Corky Siemaszko, Ohio Councilman Sparks Fury After Asking If EMS Can Stop Responding to Overdoses, http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/americas-heroin-epidemic/ohio-councilman-sparks-fury-after-asking-if-ems-can-stop-n778711

Overdose: Condolences to One Of Our Group Members Who Lost a Family Member

By now, everyone is knowledgable about the high number of opioid overdose deaths and what public health officials are calling an epidemic. In spite of public awareness and prevention efforts, the death toll continues. In this podcast, one of our group members shares his experience of the recent death of his family member from overdose. Listen in to these group members as they offer support.

Discussion Guide:

Have you lost a family member or friend to opiate overdose?

How did it affect you?

Did you have any negative automatic thoughts?

What are alternate healthier thoughts?

What could have been done differently for the person who died, prior to the overdose?

What can be done for you?

Supplemental Reading:

SAMHSA Behavioral Treatment Services Locator, https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/

SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Toolkit, http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA14-4742/Overdose_Toolkit.pdf

Overdose Awareness and Use of Naloxone Test, http://www.opiatesupportgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Overdose-Awareness-and-Use-of-Naloxone-Test.pdf

SCARE ME, http://www.opiatesupportgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/SCARE-ME.pdf

Dr. Oz’ On Air Intervention

It is a delicate matter to talk with someone about what you perceive as their shortcomings. This is especially true when you believe they are putting themselves in harms way with substance abuse. Formal, organized interventions may use "tough love"  to get the person with an addiction into treatment. This person may be confronted in a harsh or stern manner with the intent to help them in the long run. They may be presented with education, fear tactics, surprise, pressure, guilt, shame and resources. Dr. Oz orchestrated a public intervention on his nationally televised show. Listen to this support group discuss their reactions to Dr. Oz' intervention.

Discussion Guide:

Are you familiar with the concept "Tough Love"? If so, what is it?

Have you been the subject of an intervention?

If so, did you find the intervention more helpful or hurtful?

When people have expressed their concerns about your substance use, did they lean more heavily on "tough" or "love"?

Are you familiar with motivational interviewing, a counseling approach to help people work through ambivalence? What are the principles of motivational interviewing?

How would you advise someone talk to someone who has problems with substances?

Supplemental Reading:

Jami Wolf-Dolan, PsyD, What I Learned About Addiction From Attending the Dr. Oz Show, http://www.thefix.com/what-i-learned-about-addiction-attending-dr-oz-show

When Treatment Programs Are Abusive

It is a sad occurrence when people seek help and instead find abusive practices. Kenneth "Kenny" Chatman and his wife operated a sober home in Florida committing acts of human rights violations and fraud. He was sentenced to 27 1/2 years in prison and his wife could be sentenced to 10 years. Chatman pled guilty to money laundering, healthcare fraud and sex trafficking. He admitted he controlled his patients by taking their car keys, phones, medication and food stamps. He allowed his patients to do drugs in his sober homes, as long as they let him bill their insurance for treatment they never received. Some patients died. Hopefully, these crimes are few among recovery programs. Listen in to this opiate support group talk about their reactions and experiences in treatment. Warning: The content of this podcast may be disturbing.

Discussion Guide:

Have you experienced poor treatment in a recovery program?

If so, did you file a complaint, and did you receive a satsifactory response?

What are the pros and cons of informing the authorities about poor practices of the facility, staff or other patients?

Do you know how to find a reputable program?

Supplemental Reading:

Lawrence Mower, Sober Home Owner Kenny Chatman Pleads Guilty, Faces Life in Prison http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/sober-home-owner-kenny-chatman-pleads-guilty-faces-life-prison/0YngSRJ4ZjbgfsO74e2neL/

Zachary Seigel, South Florida Sober Home Operator Sentenced To 27 1/2 Years, Crackdown Continues, http://www.thefix.com/south-florida-sober-home-operator-sentenced-27-12-years-crackdown-continues

What You Should Know About Methadone

Opioid addiction and overdose deaths are an epidemic. Methadone treatment for this epidemic is the treatment of choice. And yet, the stigma surrounding this effective medication keeps people from getting the help they need. Listen to this opiate support group discuss their experience of methadone.

Discussion Guide:

1. Methadone has been used to help treat heroin addiction and other opioid use disorders for over 50 years. Where and why was it developed? When was it first used to treat addiction?

2. Methadone is the most successful treatment option for opioid misuse, period. What research and statistics back up this assertion?

3. Methadone is a medical treatment for a medical condition. Why wouldn't you treat it with a medicine?

4. Propaganda and stigma prevent many people from seeking MAT and can contribute to people leaving treatment early. Has the stigma against Methadone caused you to consider tapering your dose for a premature discharge?

5. Relapse is much less likely to result in a fatal overdose because Methadone provides a protective barrier. What is meant by a protective barrier?

6. Methadone, as a controlled substance, is one of the most tightly-regulated medications in the United States. And yet, a stigma persists that it is easily abused. Why?

7. Methadone isn't right for everyone. Who would not be appropriate for Methadone assisted treatment?

Supplemental Reading:

Jeremy Galloway, 7 Things You Need to Know About Methadone Treatment, http://www.thefix.com/7-things-you-need-know-about-methadone-treatment

Should You Stop? Criteria for Ceasing Medication Assisted Treatment

The properties of Medication Assisted Treatment are such that they stop withdrawal symptoms, decrease cravings and block the user from getting high if they use opiates. Because of this, MAT is a godsend to opiate addicts. But many hope to stop MAT at some point. Have you thought about tapering off your medication? What do you hope for and what do you fear about ceasing your medication? Listen to a group of opiate addicts discuss their hopes and fears.

Discussion Guide:

Do you intend to stop utilizing medication assisted treatment for your recovery?

How long do you believe one should engage in treatment before tapering off medication?

What are the pros and cons of stopping your medication?

Do you meet the criteria for ceasing medication assisted treatment?

What are your fears of ceasing MAT?

Supplemental Reading:

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Client Handbook, Chapter 8 How Long Will I Be On Methadone? http://www.camh.ca/en/hospital/health_information/a_z_mental_health_and_addiction_information/methadone/Documents/mmt_client_hndbk.pdf