Tag Archives: recovery

What’s the Purpose of Support Groups?

Should you talk about your addiction war stories? Some people believe that telling your addiction history is not helpful. They fear that it could cause cravings and relapse to themselves and others. On the other hand, isn't your support group the appropriate place to talk out your trauma? It can be healing. Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss the rationale and goals of support groups.

Discussion Guide:

Have you felt that some of your group members have glorified their drug related behavior in the past?

If so, has that triggered a craving or relapse for you?

What are the pros and cons of telling your story to other group members?

What do you think the rationale and goals of support groups are?

What is the most helpful thing that you have experienced from your support group?

Supplemental Reading:

Group Interventions for Treatment of Psychological Trauma, http://www.agpa.org/docs/default-source/practice-resources/group-interventions-for-treatment-of-trauma-in-adults.pdf?sfvrsn=2, see page 32-33.

Trauma and Addiction are Connected

It is not surprising that people who have been traumatized are more likely to abuse substances. For example, those who have been sexually abused are more likely to use drugs than the general public. It is said that they are 3.4 times more likely to use marijuana, 6 times more likely to use cocaine, 10 times more likely to use other major drugs. This podcast explores the connection between trauma and addiction. Listen in to hear this opiate recovery group discuss their experiences and opinions.

Discussion Guide:

Have you experienced trauma?

Do you believe the trauma predisposed you to an addiction?

What would you say the root cause of your addiction is?

Some say that you are as sick as your secrets. Have you had counseling to address the trauma?

If you went to rehab, were you in a dual diagnosis program? Was it helpful?

What would you look for in a counselor?

Supplemental Reading:

Jennifer Storm, How Trauma, Victimization and Addiction Are All Connected, http://www.thefix.com/how-trauma-victimization-and-addiction-are-all-connected

Kaiser Permanente, Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) Questionnaire http://www.ncjfcj.org/sites/default/files/Finding%20Your%20ACE%20Score.pdf

Opiatesupportgroup.com Podcast, Childhood Trauma Is Found to Underlie Most Addictions, May 21, 2017

Group Member Profiles: What’s Their Story?

Our group received an email this week from Dan. He wrote "I have listened to every one of your podcasts and I really enjoy them. The one thing I have noticed is that we never learn about the stories of how the people in the discussion got addicted in the first place. It would be nice if any of the members would be willing to talk about their histories. Keep up the good work and thank you for what you all do." Dan asked for it, and we delivered. Listen in to hear three group members share their stories.

Discussion Guide:

What is your addiction story?

Describe your life before addiction.

Describe your life during active addiction.

Describe your recovery process.

What is your biggest regret?

What advise would you give others?

What do you hope for in the future?

 

 

Vivitrol Manufacturer Tries to Corner the Market on Opioid Medication Treatment

A drug manufacturer is at it again. Manufacturer, Alkermes, the maker of Vivitrol, is cashing in on the opioid epidemic. They are successfully lobbying legislation to pass bills in support of Vivitrol. Vivitrol is an opioid blocker which should prevent addicts from experiencing euphoria if they take heroin or pain killers. It also cuts cravings. These are also the properties of Methadone and Suboxone. Vivitrol is costly at $1000 for a shot that remains in the system for one month. Alkermes made $209 million in 2016 through their lobbying efforts coast to coast. They are alleged to be giving misinformation about Methadone and Suboxone and purposefully lobbying to restrict their use. Listen in to this opiate support group as they talk about this issue.

Discussion Guide:

Are you familiar with Vivitrol? What do you know about it, and have you been treated with it?

Do you believe that Vivitrol should be legislated for use, over Methadone and Suboxone?

What are the pros and cons of each of these medications in terms of cost, administration and adjunct treatment? (Vivitrol, Methadone and Suboxone)

What types of patients would do better on each?

Supplemental Reading:

Jake Harper, NPR, A Drugmaker Tries to Cash In On The Opioid Epidemic, One State Law At a Time, http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/12/523774660/a-drugmaker-tries-to-cash-in-on-the-opioid-epidemic-one-state-law-at-a-time

Should We Relax HIPAA Regulations to Allow Release of Information to Family Members When Someone Overdoses?

Health Insurance Portability and Accountabiity Act (HIPAA) regulates the confidentiality of health records. Presently, healthcare records cannot be released without the informed consent of a patient. Governor Chris Christie, who is leading an opioid task force, was asked to consider relaxing HIPAA regulations in order to allow family members to be informed of a member's non-lethal overdose. This knowledge could open the door to treatment options. Listen in to this opiate support group discuss their opinions.

Discussion Guide:

If you were to overdose and received services from a healthcare provider, would you want that information released to your family?

Under what circumstances would you want your family to be informed of your overdose?

What are the pros and cons of relaxing HIPAA regulations in the case of overdose?

Narcan (also known as Naltrexone) is a life saving measure. Do you have Narcan available? Have you instructed your family and associates in how to use it?

Supplemental Reading:

Erin Mershon and Andrew Joseph, Do Family Members Have a Right to Know When a Loved one Overdoses on Opioids? https://www.statnews.com/2017/06/13/overdoses-family-notification/

Overdose: Condolences to One Of Our Group Members Who Lost a Family Member

By now, everyone is knowledgable about the high number of opioid overdose deaths and what public health officials are calling an epidemic. In spite of public awareness and prevention efforts, the death toll continues. In this podcast, one of our group members shares his experience of the recent death of his family member from overdose. Listen in to these group members as they offer support.

Discussion Guide:

Have you lost a family member or friend to opiate overdose?

How did it affect you?

Did you have any negative automatic thoughts?

What are alternate healthier thoughts?

What could have been done differently for the person who died, prior to the overdose?

What can be done for you?

Supplemental Reading:

SAMHSA Behavioral Treatment Services Locator, https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/

SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Toolkit, http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA14-4742/Overdose_Toolkit.pdf

Overdose Awareness and Use of Naloxone Test, http://www.opiatesupportgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Overdose-Awareness-and-Use-of-Naloxone-Test.pdf

SCARE ME, http://www.opiatesupportgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/SCARE-ME.pdf

Dr. Oz’ On Air Intervention

It is a delicate matter to talk with someone about what you perceive as their shortcomings. This is especially true when you believe they are putting themselves in harms way with substance abuse. Formal, organized interventions may use "tough love"  to get the person with an addiction into treatment. This person may be confronted in a harsh or stern manner with the intent to help them in the long run. They may be presented with education, fear tactics, surprise, pressure, guilt, shame and resources. Dr. Oz orchestrated a public intervention on his nationally televised show. Listen to this support group discuss their reactions to Dr. Oz' intervention.

Discussion Guide:

Are you familiar with the concept "Tough Love"? If so, what is it?

Have you been the subject of an intervention?

If so, did you find the intervention more helpful or hurtful?

When people have expressed their concerns about your substance use, did they lean more heavily on "tough" or "love"?

Are you familiar with motivational interviewing, a counseling approach to help people work through ambivalence? What are the principles of motivational interviewing?

How would you advise someone talk to someone who has problems with substances?

Supplemental Reading:

Jami Wolf-Dolan, PsyD, What I Learned About Addiction From Attending the Dr. Oz Show, http://www.thefix.com/what-i-learned-about-addiction-attending-dr-oz-show

When Treatment Programs Are Abusive

It is a sad occurrence when people seek help and instead find abusive practices. Kenneth "Kenny" Chatman and his wife operated a sober home in Florida committing acts of human rights violations and fraud. He was sentenced to 27 1/2 years in prison and his wife could be sentenced to 10 years. Chatman pled guilty to money laundering, healthcare fraud and sex trafficking. He admitted he controlled his patients by taking their car keys, phones, medication and food stamps. He allowed his patients to do drugs in his sober homes, as long as they let him bill their insurance for treatment they never received. Some patients died. Hopefully, these crimes are few among recovery programs. Listen in to this opiate support group talk about their reactions and experiences in treatment. Warning: The content of this podcast may be disturbing.

Discussion Guide:

Have you experienced poor treatment in a recovery program?

If so, did you file a complaint, and did you receive a satsifactory response?

What are the pros and cons of informing the authorities about poor practices of the facility, staff or other patients?

Do you know how to find a reputable program?

Supplemental Reading:

Lawrence Mower, Sober Home Owner Kenny Chatman Pleads Guilty, Faces Life in Prison http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/sober-home-owner-kenny-chatman-pleads-guilty-faces-life-prison/0YngSRJ4ZjbgfsO74e2neL/

Zachary Seigel, South Florida Sober Home Operator Sentenced To 27 1/2 Years, Crackdown Continues, http://www.thefix.com/south-florida-sober-home-operator-sentenced-27-12-years-crackdown-continues

Resist Cravings: Distract Yourself from Obsessive Thinking

Cravings. You've all had them. Sometimes you've relapsed because of them. But do you know where they come from? They are a result of neurological changes due to substance dependence. They are the brain's way of seeking a balance for what it lacks. Listen in to this opiate support group as they discuss their experiences with cravings and how to combat them.

Discussion Guide:

What are drug cravings? How long do they last? Can you break down a craving into stages?

What's the difference between psychological and biological cravings?

Where do cravings come from?

How have you successfully resisted cravings?

Do you use grounding techniques? Which ones?

Supplemental Reading:

Luke Pool, What are drug cravings & how can I deal with them? https://800recoveryhub.blog/2017/05/25/drug-cravings/

What Do You Say to Someone Who Has Lost a Family Member to Overdose?

One of our podcast listeners asked the group for feedback. She recently lost her ex-husband to a drug overdose, leaving their son and daughter devastated by the loss. She wonders what could have gone wrong, and what prevention steps could've altered the outcome. Listen in to this support group as they give their opinions on what likely happened and what could've been done to help. Our hearts go out to Brooke and her family.

Discussion Guide:

Why would someone in a Methadone Treatment Program be so oversedated that they would have trouble staying awake, drooling, be difficult to arouse when sleeping, and awaken in a foul mood and lash out? Is this common with methadone?

What are common substances that will cause a vulnerability to overdose if mixed with Methadone?

What would motivate someone to take another substance on top of Methadone?

What are the signs and symptoms of overdose?

Do you have Narcan available in case of an overdose? Have you trained your family members in its use?

Grief is a normal reaction to loss. One aspect of grief is wondering if you could've or should've done more to prevent the death. Do you think that you can do something to prevent an overdose? What would you recommend to others?

Supplemental Reading:

SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Toolkit, http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA14-4742/Overdose_Toolkit.pdf

Overdose Awareness and Use of Naloxone Test, http://www.opiatesupportgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Overdose-Awareness-and-Use-of-Naloxone-Test.pdf

SCARE ME, http://www.opiatesupportgroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/SCARE-ME.pdf