Tag Archives: recovery

Don’t Feel Trapped by Your Medication, Get Out There and Travel

I've heard it said that Methadone is like "liquid handcuffs". This stigma prevents many people from the benefits of medication assisted treatment. People who take Methadone, Suboxone or Vivitrol can still be active, travel and have a full life. Listen in to the opiate recovery support group as they discuss their experiences and aspirations while in MMT.  

Discussion Guide:

What's on your travel bucket list?

Do you have a desire to travel to other countries but find your medication prohibitive? Is your medication a barrier to travel?

Have you Guest Dosed at a another location? What was your experience with that?

Are you familiar with other countries guidelines on importation of Methadone/Buprenorphine? What would you like to know?

Supplemental Reading:

Methadone/Buprenorphine International Travel Guide Index, http://indro-online.de/methadoneindex.htm

Couples In Recovery: You Will Either be Clean Together, Use Together, or Not be Together

Couples who enter treatment together are warned "you will either be clean together, use together, or not be together." Listen in to this opiate recovery support group podcast as a married couple discusses their recovery struggles and successes.

Discussion Guide:

Are you in a love relationship with someone who is also in recovery?

If so, would you say that you are a good influence, or bad, to each other?

What are the recovery struggles that you've experienced?

What are your recovery successes as a couple in recovery?

Supplemental Resource:

Recovering Couples Anonymous, http://recovering-couples.org/

When Children Abuse Prescription Meds

We don't expect children to purposefully abuse prescription medications. The discovery of two middle school students who were found to be under the influence of an opiate took the community by surprise. Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss prevention issues for youth.

Discussion Guide:

How old were you when you started to abuse opiates?

How did you access them?

Are you familiar with pharm parties? Have you attended one?

What do you recommend as prevention against substance abuse for children and adolescents?

Supplemental Reading:

Jacqueline Covey, School District to Address RX Abuse, http://www.clintonherald.chttp://www.clintonherald.com/news/local_news/school-district-to-address-rx-abuse/article_9b1cf436-ec55-598f-a141-a1daa1345fb5.html

Jacqueline Covey, Middle School Town Hall Talks Prescription Abuse, http://www.clintonherald.com/news/local_news/middle-school-town-hall-talks-prescription-abuse/article_0853c8e4-f888-5748-b26d-137a7650b2d8.html

Stop Using the Word “Relapse” for the Chronic Disease of Addiction. Instead use the phrase “Recurrence of Symptoms.”

The language we use to talk about addiction and recovery can cause personal shame and perpetuate public stigma against people with substance dependence. It is time to stop using the shame based word "relapse" for the chronic disease of addiction. Instead, use the phrase "recurrence of symptoms." It is more accurate, reduces shame and encourages people to re-enter treatment for a flare up when symptoms of addiction return. Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss this topic.

Discussion Guide:

What's the difference between stigma and shame?

Do you feel shamed by other's perception of your disease?

No one ever says "I want to be a drug addict one day." Yet, many people believe that you chose the life, therefore an addiction is your own damn fault and you have a moral failing.  How do you explain the process in which you became dependent?

No one is exempt from bias and stigmas, even within the recovery community. How do we best correct ourselves in order to stop reinforcing the stigma?

It is time to stop using the shame based word "relapse" for the chronic disease of addiction. No other chronic diseases refer to symptoms of their disease as a relapse. Instead, use the phrase "recurrence of symptoms." Do you agree?

Supplemental Reading:

Michael Weiner, PhD, MCAP, Eliminate Stigma from the Inside Out, http://www.addictionpro.com/article/treatment/eliminate-stigma-inside-out

President Trump Declared Opioid Crisis a Public Health Emergency

President Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency. More than 140 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose. The nation's Public Health Emergency Fund has a current balance of just $57,000. But the opioid crisis is a $14 billion problem, at minimum. Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss how they would approach the crisis, if they had the funds to do so.

Discussion Guide:

Are you familiar with the declaration of the opioid crisis as a public health emergency? How is a public health emergency different from a national emergency?

What are the pros and cons of this declaration?

If you were in a position to change policy and were given funds to address the crisis, what strategies would you recommend?

Supplemental Reading:

Claude Brodesser-Akner, 7 takeways from Trump's opioids public health emergency: What it really means, http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/10/5_takeaways_from_trumps_public_health_emergency_de.html

Should An Opioid Relapse Be a Punishable Crime?

Consider this scenario. You are on probation for a drug related crime, you quickly enter treatment and relapse early in your recovery. Should you immediately be subject to probation violation and sent to prison? Or, is the disease of addiction cause to deter criminal punishment? Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss their opinions on this topic.

Discussion Guide:

Is addiction a choice or a disease? 

Do you believe that opioid addiction causes you to be prone to relapses?

Does the threat of incarceration motivate substance dependent people toward recovery?

If  addiction is a medical condition and relapsing is a part of the disease, is it unconstitutional to punish the addict with incarceration?

Under what circumstances is incarceration a reasonable outcome for opioid addicts?  

What do you recommend as guidelines for the criminal justice system in making these decisions?

Supplemental Reading:

Deborah Becker, Court to Rule on Whether Relapse Be An Addicted Opioid User Should Be a Crime, http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/26/559541332/court-to-rule-on-whether-relapse-by-an-addicted-opioid-user-should-be-a-crime

Attitudes and Stigma Drive Opioid Treatment and Policy, Not Research

Psychiatrist, Sarz Maxwell says that one of the greatest barriers to treatment and effective drug policy are attitudes towards drugs. Addiction is not seen as a disease, but as a moral failing. Methadone and Suboxone are not drugs of choice. They are medicines. Listen in to this opiate support group discuss stigma .

Discussion Guide:

It is said that this opioid epidemic is getting worse and the stigma against opioid abusers is worsening. Why would this be the case?

Dr. Maxwell said "It is not what the person does to the drug, it's what the drug does to the person." What does this mean?

Abstinence is one of the least effective methods of treatment for opioid addiction and has the lowest recovery rate. Have you been successful with long term abstinence without medication such as Methadone and Suboxone?

"Addiction is the only disease where we expect the patient to be immediately symptom and medication free."  Do people have this expectation of you?

In a genetically predisposed addict's brain, there are too many opioid receptors and too few endorphins. This can cause people to use substances in an effort to get normal. Did you feel abnormal without an opioid boost?

 

 

 

Developing Treatment for Cocaine Addiction: TMS

Opiate addicts are fortunate to have several treatment medications that help decrease cravings, stop withdrawal, and block feelings of eupohoria from opiates. Unfortunately, there is no comparable medication for cocaine addiction. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is now being applied to stimulate areas of the brain that control impulses. This is a foreign and frightening procedure for most people. Would you be willing to zap your brain in order to be free of a cocaine addiction? Listen in to this opiate recovery group as they discuss TMS.

Discussion Guide:

Are you familiar with TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) and ECT (Electro-Convulsive Therapy)?

How do these treatments work?

Would you be willing to be zapped in an attempt to be free of cocaine?

Supplemental Reading:

Meredith Wadman, Brain-altering Magnetic Pulses Could Zap Cocaine Addiction, http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/08/brain-altering-magnetic-pulses-could-zap-cocaine-addiction

Mindfulness Helps You Cope with Cravings

People in recovery need a full recovery tool box to maintain abstinence. A new study from the University College London in the UK found that as little as 11 minutes of mindfulness training helped heavy drinkers to reduce their alcohol intake in the following week. Listen in to this opiate recovery group as they discuss whether mindfulness can be a helpful tool for opioid addicts.

Discussion Guide:

Are you familiar with "mindfulness"? What is it? Have you practiced it?

How is mindfulness different from relaxation?

How is mindfulness different from meditation?

How can mindfulness be helpful in your recovery?

Supplemental Reading:

Catharine Paddock, PhD, Very Brief Mindfulness Training Helped Heavy Drinkers Cut Back, http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319120.php

Mindfulness sessions can be accessed through a number of phone apps. Search for "mindfulness" in your app store.

When Doctors Become Addicted

Between 8% and 12% of people will develop a substance abuse problem at some point in their lives. Physicians are vulnerable to substance abuse at the same rate as the general population yet they have higher recovery rates. Doctors with the most addiction problems tend to be anesthesiologists, emergency room doctors and psychiatrists. However, they can be more reluctant to enter treatment because of the fear of losing their professional licenses. Many state medical boards run special treatment programs for physicians and others in the health care industry. Should they have specialized treatment? Listen in to this opiate recovery support group as they discuss this special population.

Discussion Guide:

Why would a physician be vulnerable to substance abuse?

What makes physicians better able to hide their addiction?

Should they have their own treatment programs?

Why would they have higher recovery rates than the general population?

Supplemental Reading:

Soumya Karlamangla, Doctors and Drug Abuse: Why Addictions Can be So Difficult, http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-doctors-addiction-20170720-story.html